Kevin's Watch Forum Index
 HomeHome   MemberlistMemberlist   RegisterRegister   SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   FAQFAQ   StatisticsStatistics  SudokuSudoku   Phoogle MapPhoogle Map 
 AlbumAlbum StoresStores   StoresItems Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Beware the decline of Christianity
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kevin's Watch Forum Index -> The Close
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Wosbald
A Brainwashed Religious Flunkie

Male
Joined: 07 Feb 2015
Posts: 3306

Thanks: 19
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts


11096 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Member of Linden's Army


PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

+JMJ+

New poll shows anti-Christian persecution a 'very severe' global concern

Quote:

Men walk in rubble Nov. 13 near St. Mary's Catholic Church and St. Elias Orthodox Church after a bombing in Damascus, Syria. Christians in the Middle East face extinction because of genocide, wars and international indifference to their plight, said speakers at a Dec. 5 panel discussion in New York. (Credit: CNS)


NEW YORK -- According to a new poll, an increasing number of Catholics believe anti-Christian persecution is a "very severe" global concern.

Results from an annual survey conducted by the papal charity Aid to the Church in Need USA released this week reveal that 46 percent of U.S. Catholics believe the issue to be a severe concern, up from only 30 percent last year. The survey also found that 58 percent of Catholics identify as "very concerned" about the plight of Christians around the globe, also up from 41 percent last year.

Yet despite the general increase in awareness and concern, the same data reveal that most U.S. Catholics believe that attention to the issue is lacking on both the local level and national levels of the U.S. Church.

Of the 1,000 respondents surveyed by McLaughlin & Associates, only 19 percent believe that their local parish is "very involved" on the issue, a drop of 18 percent from last year's data. Another 22 percent said they were "unsure" as to the Church's involvement.

On the other end of the spectrum, only 24 percent of respondents believe that their bishop is "very engaged" on the topic, down 8 percent from last year. Another 14 percent said that their bishop is "not engaged at all."

Meanwhile, Pope Francis received high marks for his involvement, with a majority (51 percent) of respondents saying they believe he is "very engaged" with the issue, while only 14 percent said they were "unsure" of the pope's involvement.

Coincidently, the pope's selected prayer intention for the month of March this year is dedicated to new Christian martyrs.

"It might be hard for us to believe, but there are more martyrs today than in the first centuries," Francis observed in the March edition of "The Pope Video."

[...]


Pope's March intention: pray for persecuted Christians [YouTube: 1 min]

_________________



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Skyweir
Lord of Light


Joined: 16 Mar 2002
Posts: 21066

Thanks: 20
Thanked 81 Times in 81 Posts

Location: Australia
43191 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Lord's Staff1 Oath of Peace1 Furls Fire


PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2019 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seriously? That is concerning.. so in what form or forms does anti Christian movement take?

Is it ridicule?

The pope mentioned martyrdom.. are many Christians losing their lives as a result of anti Christian action?

Quite honestly find it rather odd .. I know that Utah is one of the HIGHEST States with LGBT youth suicide. Thats a whole lot of hate there.. but hardly anti Christian hate.
_________________
health and healing

'Smoke me a kipper .. I'll be back for breakfast!'

EZBoard SURVIVOR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Rawedge Rim
My quest continues

Male
Joined: 26 Jul 2007
Posts: 5230

Thanks: 36
Thanked 32 Times in 30 Posts

Location: Florida
27523 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Caamora2 Lord Mhoram's Victory1 Dalek


PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Skyweir wrote:
Seriously? That is concerning.. so in what form or forms does anti Christian movement take?

Is it ridicule?

The pope mentioned martyrdom.. are many Christians losing their lives as a result of anti Christian action?

Quite honestly find it rather odd .. I know that Utah is one of the HIGHEST States with LGBT youth suicide. Thats a whole lot of hate there.. but hardly anti Christian hate.


https://www.newsweek.com/christian-persecution-genocide-worse-ever-770462
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ewelinaochab/2018/01/26/religious-persecution-the-ever-growing-threat-to-us-all/#173f6245e30f
_________________
“One accurate measurement is worth a
thousand expert opinions.”
- Adm. Grace Hopper

"Whenever you dream, you're holding the key, it opens the the door to let you be free" ..RJD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Phoogle Map
Skyweir
Lord of Light


Joined: 16 Mar 2002
Posts: 21066

Thanks: 20
Thanked 81 Times in 81 Posts

Location: Australia
43191 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Lord's Staff1 Oath of Peace1 Furls Fire


PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow I would not have imagined the degree of the issue. Its mostly Middle Eastern and Asian countries where Christianity is a minority group ... and yes that has long been a problem.

The backlash that occurs in western nations is disappointing.

Quote:
The report examined the plight of Christians in China, Egypt, Eritrea, India, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria and Turkey over the period lasting from 2015 until 2017. The research showed that in that time, Christians suffered crimes against humanity, and some were hanged or crucified


Pretty atrocious.
_________________
health and healing

'Smoke me a kipper .. I'll be back for breakfast!'

EZBoard SURVIVOR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Wosbald
A Brainwashed Religious Flunkie

Male
Joined: 07 Feb 2015
Posts: 3306

Thanks: 19
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts


11096 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Member of Linden's Army


PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

+JMJ+

Last Word: Christian Iran

Quote:



Ancient History, Ever New


On a dimly lit side street in central Tehran, a bright yellow light shines above a wooden door. Step inside and you might imagine you had left the Islamic Republic. An unveiled woman greets guests and leads them to a spacious dining room, where other women have hung their veils and monteaux at the door. It is early summer, so sleeveless tops reveal bare arms and shoulders. When one patron produces a bottle of Scotch, a waiter brings him a tumbler with ice.

This is one of Tehran's three Armenian clubs - informal "Islamic-free zones" where Armenian Christians can socialize without the constraints of Islamic law. There are other kinds of Christians in Iran - Assyrians and Chaldeans, Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox - but Armenians are the most numerous. It is estimated that there are three hundred thousand of them in Iran. They are allocated five seats in the religious-minorities section of parliament, freely attend services in the six hundred Armenian churches throughout the country, hold observer status on the powerful Guardian Council, and operate their own schools so that their children can be taught in the Armenian language.

Christianity has a long history in Iran. The Acts of the Apostles tell us that Parthians, Persians, and Medes converted to Christianity at Pentecost, and the Parthian kings allowed the new religion to spread throughout the empire. Christians fleeing Roman persecution found a safe haven there. But for the next fifteen hundred years the fortunes of Persian Christians were subject to the political conflicts that swept across Asia. The fourth-century Zoroastrian ruler Shapour II initially allowed religious freedom but then cracked down on both Christians and Jews. In the early centuries of Islamic rule, Christians enjoyed the status of a protected minority, but the Crusades revived old religious tensions. The early Mongol rulers converted to Christianity after they invaded in the thirteenth century, but when later rulers opted for Islam, Christians were again persecuted.

[...]

The main attraction is the cathedral itself, where the beauty of the Armenian religious tradition is revealed in all its glory. At the top of the central dome the creation story is painted in patterns of blue and gold. Winged cherubs, a traditional Armenian motif, decorate the stone columns, and traditional Persian imagery appears in the floral patterns that adorn the entrance ceiling.

The cathedral isn't the only church in Julfa. Knock on the wooden door of the Church of St. Mary and a caretaker will open it to admit visitors to the inner courtyard. Built by a wealthy silk merchant in the seventeenth century, St. Mary's was later expanded to accommodate overflow crowds. Then there is the Church of Bethlehem, where the life of Jesus is portrayed in seventy-two wall paintings. The crosses of both churches rise above their central domes to share the skyline with the local minarets.

Many Westerners think of Iran as a theocratic monolith. They would no doubt be surprised to discover Christians of various kinds living there comfortably. Some of these Christian communities are ancient; some arrived more recently, seeking asylum. But even the newcomers now regard Iran as their home. They think of the Shiite majority not as their hosts, but as neighbors with whom they have much in common. For example, Muslim and Christian Iranians are united in their enthusiasm for the recent nuclear deal, which will release their country from stifling economic sanctions. In an interview with the Fides News Agency, Hormoz Aslani Babroudi, director of the Pontifical Missionary Society of Iran, offered his endorsement of the agreement: "Christians, along with all the Iranian people, are rejoicing because their prayers were answered. From now on it will be easier for the world to have a positive view of Iran." He added, "We do not consider ourselves foreigners but Iranians, and we are proud of it."

_________________



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wosbald
A Brainwashed Religious Flunkie

Male
Joined: 07 Feb 2015
Posts: 3306

Thanks: 19
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts


11096 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Member of Linden's Army


PostPosted: Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

+JMJ+

Confessions of a 'Weird Catholic' [In-Depth, Opinion]

Quote:

People pray during a Pontifical High Mass Feb. 15 at St. Vincent Ferrer Church in New York City. The liturgy preceded the third annual Lepanto Conference, a one-day event featuring speakers who discussed the history, beauty and sacredness of the traditional Latin Mass. (CNS/Gregory A. Shemitz)


A recent New York Times article on "Weird Christianity" undoubtedly left some Catholics perplexed as to why all these young people are flocking to Latin Mass. Critics fear elitist anti-modern tendencies. Could this step backward into a world of bells, incense and traditional pre-modern moral norms impede the progress made since medieval days?

While traditionalism can surely lead Catholics to retreat into the past and hide from the modern world, it can also serve as an impetus to engage more deeply with the wounds and needs of today's world. The focus on beauty and materiality should inspire us to go out into the world and encounter Christ in the flesh, in the margins, as Pope Francis says, and discover how liturgy and spirituality are connected to the needs of those around us.

My first attraction to Catholicism began when I took a required philosophy of human nature course as a freshman at Fordham University. My professor, who was in her early 80s, was the first person who took my questions about life's meaning and ultimate truth seriously -- and who spoke about these matters with such gladness and certainty. "You all exist for a purpose," she would say, "and it is your duty to find out why." I needed to know what was behind this woman's bold assertion.

[...]

As I started exploring Catholicism's different spiritualities and devotions, I quickly found myself enamored by the Latin Mass and traditional piety. I fell in love with its richness, which was slightly reminiscent of the byzantine liturgy I had grown up with.

I soon realized I wasn't the only millennial attending Latin Masses.

It's true that "Weird Christianity" draws in many privileged, (upper-)middle class, mostly white, millennials, who -- like me -- grew up sheltered from the hardships and injustices that plague our society. But this bourgeois suburban setting proved to be a breeding ground for existential emptiness.

[...]

Many people flinch when they hear about traditional liturgy and spirituality because they associate it with antiquated views of women, colonialism or anti-modernism. I acknowledge that much of pre-modern Catholicism is tangled up with ugly systems of oppression. But I've found that both traditional spirituality and morality have not only imbued my life with a more tangibly definitive meaning, they have also made me more sensitive to social injustice and the suffering of others.

The demanding moral teachings of Christianity, modeled on the kenotic love Christ demonstrated on the cross, have reshaped my outlook toward life from one of self-seeking comfort to self-sacrificial charity. The witness of people like Dorothy Day, who recognized the connection between traditional doctrine and liturgy, and proximity to those on the margins, speak volumes. Accused of being both a radical communist and a conservative prude, Dorothy believed that personal holiness -- bolstered by her readings of early church fathers and medieval mystics -- and fidelity to church teaching were crucial to creating a more just social order.

I am also inspired by more contemporary examples of people like Eve Tushnet who view chastity and celibacy not as obstacles to intimacy, but as entry ways into a deeper mode of living in relationship with others.

Citing the work of queer literary critic Frederick Roden in a 2009 article "Romoeroticism," Tushnet highlights the way that the liturgical, aesthetic and sexual ethos of medieval Catholicism drew in troves of gay Brits in the Victorian era "who responded strongly to Catholicism's physicality." She continues:

Quote:
The incense smoke and flaking paint, the hint of cannibalism that recalled the Church to Her disrespectable origins, the kneeling, and the statues called to gay men and women. If you're persecuted for your reaction to gender and physicality, you may become intensely aware of bodily realities; and Catholicism, alone in the mainstream Western religious landscape, kept insisting that bodies were both important and bizarre. We alone kept saying that the flat white wafer in the priest's hands might shiver at any moment into raw and bleeding human flesh. We alone made Communion a horror story.


Tushnet's words resonate deeply with my own personal experience. Older forms of liturgy and spirituality tend to place greater emphasis on beauty, the body and the material realm as a whole. The bells and incense at Latin Mass, the gory, baroque Spanish crucifixes, and eucharistic processions have made tangible the abstract ideals we believe in in a way that the felt banners and David Haas hymns in my dad's parish never did for me.



Archbishop Michel Aupetit of Paris uses a censer as he celebrates the annual chrism Mass at historic St. Sulpice Church April 17, 2019, in the wake of the massive fire that seriously damaged the historic Notre Dame Cathedral. (CNS/Paul Haring)


[...]

This brand of spirituality that highly values the physical has allowed me to discern Christ's face keenly in the suffering of others. These experiences have made me want to understand the experiences of those who face social injustices. They've forced me to question my own privilege and the extent to which my lifestyle contributes to the suffering of others.

Yes, traditional spirituality can lead us into the temptation of making an idol out of the past and hiding from the secular world. Instead, I would urge "trads" to rely on Francis' image of the church as a field hospital and enter into the world with our alternative vision. Let's consider what a great gift we have in the "weird" expressions of our faith -- a gift our weird and wounded world is desperately in need of.

_________________



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wosbald
A Brainwashed Religious Flunkie

Male
Joined: 07 Feb 2015
Posts: 3306

Thanks: 19
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts


11096 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:
1 Member of Linden's Army


PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

+JMJ+

Cardinal likens fading Christian presence in Middle East to a sinking ship

Quote:




Lebanese Cardinal Bechara Rai, patriarch of the Maronite Catholic Church, is pictured in a 2017 file photo speaking at the In Defense of Christians Summit in Washington. He described the shrinking presence of Christians in the Middle East as a sinking ship to leaders of the Middle East Council of Churches Sept. 18, 2020. (Credit: Jaclyn Lippelmann/Catholic Standard via CNS.)


BEIRUT — Lebanese Cardinal Bechara Rai warned that the Christian presence in the Middle East is shrinking and church leaders “are called to face the winds that blow in our homelands.”

The assessment by the patriarch of Maronite Catholics during a meeting of the Middle East Council of Churches executive committee Sept. 18 underscored the dire reality facing Christians in the tumultuous region.

“The ship threatened by strong winds and waves” that is sinking symbolizes “the witnessing church in the sea of our Middle Eastern countries troubled by the winds of conflicts and wars, political, economic, financial and livelihood crises, and the corona epidemic,” Rai said.

The cardinal also explained at the meeting he hosted at Bkerke, the Maronite patriarchate north of Beirut, that the threat “reached its climax” in Lebanon with the catastrophic double explosion in the port of Beirut Aug. 4. The disaster left nearly 200 people dead, injured another 6,000, and displaced more than 300,000 people.

He stressed that the MECC is called in such turbulent time to work with churches and their leaders, institutions and the faithful “to face the waves and winds that ravage their homelands … with stances of faith and hope.”

“We ask you, Lord, through the intercession of our Mother Virgin Mary, the star of the sea in the storm, to lead our homelands, our churches and our people to the port of safety,” Rai pleaded.

The MECC in its final statement reiterated its appeal for an end to “the destructive wars and conflicts in the Middle East, to protect human dignity, and build peace on the basis of justice and rights.”

Meeting participants expressed their “deep solidarity” with the Lebanese in the “catastrophic tragedy” they are suffering from the Beirut explosions. They called for continued “ecumenical ecclesiastical efforts with all local, regional and international partners to lift the material and psychological repercussions of this tragedy.”

They also expressed their solidarity with all those affected by the coronavirus pandemic, especially people who have lost loved ones, offered appreciation to medical and humanitarian aid teams, and assured their continued prayers for an end to the pandemic.

[…]

_________________



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jazzy Fuzen
License to Copycat


Joined: 06 May 2018
Posts: 1769

Thanks: 4
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts

Location: Plasticdisguiseville
3330 White Gold Dollars
Tokens
HP

User Items:


PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Post
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kevin's Watch Forum Index -> The Close All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Page 8 of 8

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by Earthpower © Kevin's Watch